About Wim Demey

For more than 23 years Wim Demey has been active in software testing and has evolved to a generalist covering different aspects and roles within testing.
Driven by versatility and a great eagerness to learn new things, Wim is always looking how and where he can stretch his comfort zone to manage new challenges. This fits perfectly with his role as Solution Architect Testing for CTG Belgium. In this role he supports & advices customers about their testing related challenges. He has a special interest in technical topics like performance testing, test management tools and AI.
Wim is a regular speaker at (inter)national test conferences & seminars.

Fun fact: In his spare time, he likes running & gravel biking and has recently become an AFOL (Adult Fan of Lego).

Speech title:

Is survival of the fittest only for the fastest?

About his speech:

Test automation, continuous integration, pipelines… the need for speed has just exponentially increased over the last decade. Applying Darwin’s theory, it is quite simple: only the fittest –in this case the fastest- will survive. Traditional, manual testers are like a rhinoceros… in danger of extinction.
Since the introduction of test automation and lately DevOps, manual testers have to deal with a lot of technologies aiming to automate activities as part of the software development lifecycle. Terms like continuous integration, release trains, test driven development, gherkin, build servers, etc. have become the new normal.
What does this mean for the position of the manual tester? Do you still have a job within 1, 3 or 5 years? If we consider manual testing as executing pre-scripted cases, the chance is great that our job will be eaten by test automation. However, in the complex IT landscape where we are living in, there are still enough cases where test automation is either not recommended or not possible (due to the complexity of the product). Having their shortcomings, test automation cannot be the one and only way of evaluating the quality of software.
Since the world around us has evolved, manual testing has to do the same to remain relevant. So how can we –manual testers- adapt ourselves to this new context? 




About Wim Demey

For more than 23 years Wim Demey has been active in software testing and has evolved to a generalist covering different aspects and roles within testing.
Driven by versatility and a great eagerness to learn new things, Wim is always looking how and where he can stretch his comfort zone to manage new challenges. This fits perfectly with his role as Solution Architect Testing for CTG Belgium. In this role he supports & advices customers about their testing related challenges. He has a special interest in technical topics like performance testing, test management tools and AI.
Wim is a regular speaker at (inter)national test conferences & seminars.

Fun fact: In his spare time, he likes running & gravel biking and has recently become an AFOL (Adult Fan of Lego).

Speech title:

Is survival of the fittest only for the fastest?

About his speech:

Test automation, continuous integration, pipelines… the need for speed has just exponentially increased over the last decade. Applying Darwin’s theory, it is quite simple: only the fittest –in this case the fastest- will survive. Traditional, manual testers are like a rhinoceros… in danger of extinction.
Since the introduction of test automation and lately DevOps, manual testers have to deal with a lot of technologies aiming to automate activities as part of the software development lifecycle. Terms like continuous integration, release trains, test driven development, gherkin, build servers, etc. have become the new normal.
What does this mean for the position of the manual tester? Do you still have a job within 1, 3 or 5 years? If we consider manual testing as executing pre-scripted cases, the chance is great that our job will be eaten by test automation. However, in the complex IT landscape where we are living in, there are still enough cases where test automation is either not recommended or not possible (due to the complexity of the product). Having their shortcomings, test automation cannot be the one and only way of evaluating the quality of software.
Since the world around us has evolved, manual testing has to do the same to remain relevant. So how can we –manual testers- adapt ourselves to this new context? You can realize that by implementing following messages:

  • Transform to no sheep testers
  • CRUD the crap
  • Get a Fika
  • Think glocally

This session will elaborate each of those messages in depth.